Trent & Peak Archaeology / The University of Nottingham
Press photos
About the Project Home Trent & Peak  Archaeology Nottingham’s  Caves What about  my cave? Project Team About  laser scanning Nottingham Caves Survey
Press Photos Any photos on this page are free to be used and republished. Captions below. Please credit all republished photos to Trent & Peak Archaeology / The University of Nottingham. Feel free also to embed our YouTube videos: http://www.youtube.com/NottinghamCaves 
Caption: The Nottingham Caves Survey logo
Caption: Laser-scanned image of caves behind the Brewhouse Yard, below Nottingham Castle
Caption: Laser-scanned image of Nottingham Castle and the medieval Mortimer’s Hole tunnel, leading to Brewhouse Yard
Caption: Laser-scanned image of caves in the Castle Rock, including Mortimer’s Hole,  Brewhouse Yard caves, and Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem Inn caves.
Caption: Dr David Walker of the Nottingham Caves Survey photographing in the Goose Gate caves
Caption: Laser-scanned image of Nottingham Castle and the medieval Mortimer’s Hole tunnel, leading to Brewhouse Yard
Caption: The Nottingham Caves Survey is conducted entirely with equipment transported by trailer-pulling bicycle. No parking worries and a low-carbon alternative.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of King David’s Dungeon, below Nottingham Castle. King David II of Scotland was reputedly held captive here in 1346.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of caves in the Castle Rock, including Mortimer’s Hole,  Brewhouse Yard caves, and Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem Inn caves.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of Nottingham Castle and the medieval Mortimer’s Hole tunnel, leading to Brewhouse Yard
Caption: Dr David Walker of the Nottingham Caves Survey with the Leica HDS6100 laser scanner. This instrument captures up to 500000 survey points per second.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of caves in the Castle Rock, including Mortimer’s Hole,  Brewhouse Yard caves, and Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem Inn caves.
Caption: Elevation map coloured by height of the 8 Castle Gate medieval maltings. The round cave on the left is a malt kiln.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of of caves beneath the Guildhall, Nottingham, without buildings. These caves were used as wartime and Cold War air raid shelters.
Caption: Laser-scanned image of of caves beneath the Guildhall, Nottingham, with buildings above. These caves were used as wartime and Cold War air raid shelters.
Caption: Carved sandstone pillar in the 8 Castle Gate medieval malt kiln. Underground maltings like these allowed beer to be brewed all year round, making Nottingham famous for its ale.
Caption: Laser scanned orthographic plan of the Goose Gate caves, Nottingham. These caves include a medieval malt kiln, 18th-century brewery cellars and a 19th-century butchery.  
Caption: Laser-scanned orthographic plan of the Peel Street caves, Nottingham’s largest cave system. This sand mine was excavated between 1780 and 1820.
Caption: Laser-scanned image the real Mortimer’s Hole tunnel into Nottingham Castle. This secret passage was used in 1330 to infiltrate the Castle.
Caption: Caves cut into the Nottingham Castle Rock on Castle Road. These caves are hidden behind locked wooden doors.
Caption: Surveying the Castle Rock, Nottingham, with a Leica HDS6100 phase-based laser scanner.  
Caption: Julia Clarke of the Nottingham Caves Survey examining the Peel Street sand mine caves, Nottingham.
Caption: Julia Clarke of the Nottingham Caves Survey surveying the Peel Street sand mine caves, Nottingham, with a Leica HDS6100 laser scanner.
Caption: Laser scanned silhouette image of some of the caves beneath Nottingham Castle.
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